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BBC launch new weather graphics

The BBC launched their new TV weather forecast graphics on their lunchtime news today. This follows a staggered roll out of their new weather app and website graphics over the past couple of weeks.  Over the last year the BBC have been working with their new weather services provider, MeteoGroup, to develop the new graphics – the biggest change in more than 10 years.

Met Office: Five-year forecast indicates further warming

A new forecast published by the Met Office indicates the annual global average temperature is likely to exceed 1°C during the next five years (2018-2022).

It also notes that there is a 10% chance that the temperature could reach 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels (1850–1900) for at least one year during that period. The 2015 Paris agreement requires us to limit warming well below 2°C and to aim for 1.5°C.  

Met Office launches #3wordweather initiative

Slang words such as 'Baltic', 'sad', 'chucking it down', ‘raining cats and dogs’, ‘pelting it down’ or ‘bucketing’ are used far and wide to describe the weather – but the list is extensive and it is regionally variable, which can therefore make it even more difficult to communicate the weather forecast.

A new initiative by the Met Office is hoping to improve its weather forecasts in order to avoid misinterpretation. They need your help to determine, for example, the most popular slang term (per region) for rain and to understand how the public interpret their weather symbols.

River Seine reaches peak in French flooding

The River Seine in Paris rose to four metres above its normal water level for the time of year, peaking at 5.84 m on Monday 29th January.

This was due to weeks of the heaviest rainfall in decades, with the country receiving almost double its typical rainfall for January. Paris received 167.4 mm through the first 28 days of January.

Storm Georgina

Storm Georgina, the seventh named storm of the year, brought strong winds to the UK and Ireland on 24th January 2018.

Gusts up to 85mph were recorded in Scotland. Further south a narrow band of heavy rain and squally winds resulted in gusts in the 50 to 60 mph range, downing some trees and flooding some roads. A landslide was also reported on the A76 between Kirkconnel and Kelloholm in Dumfries and Galloway.

2017: the warmest year on record without an El Niño theWeather Club Thu, 18/01/2018 - 14:44

Data from the Met Office Hadley Centre and the University of East Anglia's Climatic Research Unit for global average near-surface temperatures confirm that 2017 was the warmest year on record without the influence of warming from El Niño.

Last year was the second or third warmest year for annual global temperatures since 1850, after 2015 and 2016 both of which were dominated by a significant El Niño.

Successive storms: Fionn and David theWeather Club Thu, 18/01/2018 - 13:09

Storm Fionn was named by Met Éireann and affected the Republic of Ireland on 16th January. Strong winds were recorded, especially across western counties, with the highest gust of 75 mph recorded at Mace Head, Galway. The winds across the UK were not strong enough to bring any significant impacts to the UK.

At least seventeen dead in California mudslides theWeather Club Wed, 10/01/2018 - 12:02

At least 17 people have died and 163 people injured in deep mudslides in Southern California, which were triggered by heavy rains. A number of people are still unaccounted for.

Mud and boulders the size of small cars shut rolled done hillsides blocking more than 30 miles of main roads in parts of Santa Barbara. In Montecito some homes were knocked off their foundations, with 100 destroyed and 300 damaged, whilst in Burbank mud swept away vehicles.

Snowfall in the Sahara Desert

More than 40cm (15 inches) of snow has blanketed sand dunes across the small town of Ain Sefra, Algeria which is 1,000 metres above sea level and surrounded by the Atlas Mountains. It is the second time snow has fallen in nearly 40 years, with the last occurring in December 2016.

A spokesman for the Met Office said: "Cold air was pulled down south in to North Africa over the weekend as a result of high pressure over Europe. The high pressure meant the cold weather extended further south than normal."