RMetS Podcast - Episode 5

Episode 5 - WeatherLive - Gardening In A Changing Climate Interview

In the final interview from our WeatherLive Conference, we talk with two people from the Royal Horticultural Society about the challenges that gardeners face now and those they'll face in the future, as the climate changes.

We discuss the findings of the recent RHS report, "Gardening In A Changing Climate" with Dr Eleanor Webster, who is an Environmental Climate Scientist at The RHS and Robert Brett, the RHS Curator at Hyde Hall, in Essex.

RMetS Podcast - Episode 4

Episode 4 - WeatherLive - The Great Storm Interview

We hosted our annual WeatherLive Conference in London on Nov 4th 2017. The event coincided with the 30th anniversary of "The Great Storm", unexpected hurricane strength winds that battered the southern counties of the UK on the 16th of October, 1987.

In this episode we discuss the effects of the storm - both immediate and long lasting - with two former BBC weathermen, Michael Fish and Peter Gibbs and Ed Ikin, from the Royal Horticultural Society.

RMetS Podcast - Episode 3

Episode 3 - WeatherLive - Weather & Photography Interview

We hosted our annual WeatherLive Conference in London on Nov 4th 2017. In this episode we talk with two of the speakers from the morning session, which was focused on (no pun intended!) Weather & Photography.

Michael Pritchard is the Chief Executive of the Royal Photographic Society and his talk was on how the technical developments in photography since 1839 have allowed photographers to capture weather in their images. 

Met Office: Five-year forecast indicates further warming

A new forecast published by the Met Office indicates the annual global average temperature is likely to exceed 1°C during the next five years (2018-2022).

It also notes that there is a 10% chance that the temperature could reach 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels (1850–1900) for at least one year during that period. The 2015 Paris agreement requires us to limit warming well below 2°C and to aim for 1.5°C.