uk

All-time temperature records broken in UK and Europe

Thursday 25th July 2019 was a record-breaking day for temperatures in the UK and parts of central and western Europe; The UK's all-time temperature record was broken, with 38.7 °C recorded at Cambridge Botanic Garden. The provisional value was released on Friday but was subject to quality control and analysis, and has now been validated by the Met Office observations’ team. This figure exceeds the previous record of 38.5°C recorded in Faversham, Kent, in August 2003.  

Unprecedented Heat and Intense Thunderstorms

The UK and central Europe experienced a number of intense heatwaves this summer, with all-time records being broken in many places.

Across Europe the heat began to build at the start of summer, and by the last week of June local temperature records were being broken. France recorded an all-time record high temperature of 46 °C on 28th June during a 9 day heatwave.

Storm Eleanor causes disruption at the start of 2018

On 2nd and 3rd January, a low-pressure system moving across from the Atlantic brought very wet and windy weather to the UK.  Storm Eleanor, the fifth named storm of the season, brought gusts of up to 100 mph, leaving thousands of homes without power, blowing over trees and disrupting travel across parts of Wales, England, southern Scotland and most of Northern Ireland.

Snow!

Swathes of the country were blanketed in snow on 10th and 11th December 2017, particularly Wales and large parts of England, as the Met Office issued yellow and amber warnings to many parts. The heavy snow led to power cuts, disrupted air, rail and road travel and resulted in hundreds of schools in England and Wales staying closed on the 11th.

Winter is coming

The maps above show the UK winter (Dec, Jan, Feb) averages for 1981-2010. The analyses are based on 1 km grid-point data sets which are derived from station data (Source: Met Office)

As we approach the winter season and temperatures start to dip, we take a look at winter weather in the UK – what affects it, seasonal extremes, what an ‘average’ winter looks like and link to some ‘wintry’ articles of interest.