science lesson

Science Lesson: An introduction to remote sensing theWeather Club Wed, 01/08/2018 - 10:27

Satellites for observing the Earth’s surface have been used since the 70’s and ever since advanced our understanding in science. Using satellites allows us to observe and detect changes in the most remote regions of the Earth. The first land cover satellite named Landsat 1 was launched by the United States on 23 July 1972. This mission and many more have continued providing an enormous collection of satellite imagery.

RMetS Podcast - Episode 8 - El Niño: Interview with Adam Scaife

Professor Liz Bentley sits down to interview Adam Scaife, Head of Long Rang Prediction at the Met Office and Professor at Exeter University, about the El Niño and La Niña, the largest seasonal fluctuation in the Earth's atmosphere.

After the interview Liz and Chloe discuss the two conferences that we are holding in York in July - The Atmospheric Science Conference 2018 (3rd - 4th July) and The Evolution of Science: Past, Present and Future, or conference for Students and Early Career Scientists.

What is El Niño - Southern Oscillation? theWeather Club Fri, 08/06/2018 - 09:53

What is El Niño? 

The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a large-scale climatic phenomenon that originates in the tropical Pacific but affects global climate patterns. The warm phase is known as El Niño and the cold phase is La Niña. El Niño occurs irregularly every two to seven years and peaks around in winter. 

What causes an El Niño event?

El Niño theWeather Club Sun, 20/07/2014 - 14:28

The name El Niño, Spanish for ‘child’or ‘the Christ child’, was first used by fishermen along the coasts of Ecuador and Peru to refer to a warm ocean current that typically appears around Christmastime and lasts for several months. Fish are less abundant during these warm intervals, so fishermen often took a break to repair their equipment and spend time with their families.