Weather Watch

WMO - El Niño 2019

The WMO has announced that there is a high probability of an El Niño event in early 2019. Although the event has not been forecasted to be as strong as the 2016 event, El Niño is known to have a major impact on temperatures and rainfall across the globe.

The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a large-scale climatic phenomenon that originates in the tropical Pacific but affects global climate patterns. The warm phase is known as El Niño and the cold phase is La Niña. El Niño occurs irregularly every two to seven years and peaks around in winter. 

WeatherLive and WPOTY Public Vote

The Royal Meteorological Society is hosting an extreme weather conference to explore the severe weather events and climates around the world. Whether it's tornadoes or hurricanes, working in extreme conditions or communicating high impact weather, we'll take a closer look at extreme weather - its power, its beauty, its occasional absurdity and its fragility in the face of human activity.

Pacific Typhoon Mangkhut

 

On the 7th of September 2018 a tropical storm formed near the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean moving north west. First referred to as Tropical Depression 26W, it strengthened into a typhoon soon after. The Japan Meteorological Agency named it Mangkhut. NASA’s Aqua satellite captured Typhoon Mangkhut lashing Guam and the Northern Marinas Islands on 10 September (UTC).

Winter is coming

The maps above show the UK winter (Dec, Jan, Feb) averages for 1981-2010. The analyses are based on 1 km grid-point data sets which are derived from station data (Source: Met Office)

As we approach the winter season and temperatures start to dip, we take a look at winter weather in the UK – what affects it, seasonal extremes, what an ‘average’ winter looks like and link to some ‘wintry’ articles of interest.

Damp or dry? Measuring humidity

Measuring humidity is easier than you might think, especially with modern day instruments.

Humidity is the amount of water vapour, an invisible gas, in the air. Warm air can ‘hold’ more water vapour than cold air; in fact air at 35°C can hold six times more water vapour as air at 5°C. All meteorological instruments measure the relative humidity (RH); this is the amount of water vapour in the air compared to the amount required to saturate it, given as a percentage - so completely saturated air has a RH of 100%.

Temperature extremes in your garden

Taking temperature measurements in your garden is a great way to start investigating microclimates. We take a look at some maximum-minimum thermometers on the market.

Just how cold did it get last night and how hot will it be this afternoon? You can measure these daily extreme temperatures in your own garden using a maximum-minimum thermometer. A variety of thermometers are available in high street stores, garden centres and online, ranging from the traditional to the hi-tech.

Microclimates in the garden

Every garden has a number of different microclimates, and these have an effect on not only the temperature but also the amount of rainfall and wind strength. Even within a small garden, there can be large differences in conditions. If you have been digging or weeding your garden for a while, you will probably have discovered hot, dry corners and cold, draughty spaces. Understanding the microclimates in your garden really gives you a head start. Most gardeners want light and shade, dry and damp, sheltered and exposed areas in which to grow different plants and create contrasting spaces.